Day 25 and 26: Princess Louisa Inlet

Three nights here is the minimum you want because it is simply a Shangri-La and you can’t help but become nearly numb with peacefulness. This holds true despite the weather we found…last time here was in August and we were in 85-90 degrees but the first day here it rained, second was overcast and gloomy and the third soared into the 80’s! We just really got into the down time, reading, games, naps, kayaking, hikes, cooking our favorites and finally swimming on the last day! Swimming is interesting here because we anchored right in front of freezing mountain fresh water falls which are met with the warmed sea behind us. Later in the summer the falls are warmed by rocks and temperatures and swimming is similar to a heated pool. But for now even with the incoming tide it was a very cold swim to the falls shoreline. We didn’t stay long and by the time we were back to our boat the salt water seemed suddenly warm in comparison. Bill didn’t want to get out yet so took advantage of the warm seas and did some cleaning of the sea life build up on our trim tabs as well as checked our rudder and prop. This was the coldest water Donna remembers being in with the exception of some high mountain River swimming hole from her teens (doesn’t count!). Not too crowded since we avoided the weekend and we just watched people come and go. There is absolutely no cell service, no GPS signal and no radio here…The remoteness here on top of such profound beauty is what really makes the difference and it is at the top of our list of favorite places to get lost in.

Day 24: Egmont to Princess Louisa Inlet

No rush this sunny morning as we plan to ride in incoming tide to Princess Louisa that begins at noon. So after showers and cleanup we headed out for a hike to Sechelt Rapids (aka Skookumchuck Rapids) to see what an extra large ebbing tide looks like. Once again we didn’t realize how long a hike this would end up being and fortunately stopped at the bakery in the woods along the way – aptly named Skookumchuck Bakery and Cafe. What a treat with fresh baked english muffin breakfast sandwich and fresh toasted wheat bread with butter and avocado. Took it on the hike. The hike was three miles one way but on a well kept trail through rain forest setting and a very large pond. It’s difficult to describe Sechelt Rapids in full song – it’s a very inspiring demonstration of nature’s power. A wide, roaring salt water river moving at 16 knots complete with rapids and deep wide whirlpools winding around small islands and rock outcroppings. Truly an amazing sight. These are said to be the fastest tidal rapids in the world. The energy represented here is stunning. Well worth the seven mile, three hour hike.

Returned to Sea Natural at noon, topped off the fresh water tank and headed north for the 30 mile fjord cruise on an incoming tide. We had plenty of time since we couldn’t cross Malibu Rapids (the tidal barrier to Princess Louisa) until 6pm. Saved a lot of fuel at 1.7 GPH arriving at 5pm while enjoying spectacular mountain to sea scenery along the way. We thought we would have to wait an hour or so to enter the rapids but saw a sailboat and then another enter before we arrived. So we boldly entered an hour early on a flood tide for a nice little ride past the popular Malibu Young Life Christian Camp. Once inside the dog legged inlet we headed toward the nearby MacDonald Island and five park mooring bouys in hopes of a vacancy. Phew, only one in use so we roped on for an easy and secure anchorage. The sky turned dark with fewer sun breaks as the day wore on until thunderstorms appeared again. The sound was dramatic as the booms echoed throughout the fjord. More rain throughout the night rinsing our boat of salt spray. We will wait until morning at this quiet anchorage and watch for boats to pass by on their way out for the twice daily slack tide at Malibu Rapids before heading around the corner to see the scenery grow in size.

As all the literature says, there are no words to describe this special place. The area measured on the water is not that large, like a large harbor or bay, but the rocky walls of this fjord rise to snow topped mountain tops quickly with numerous waterfalls all around the largest being Chatterbox Falls at the head of the inlet. There is an illusion of being on a high mountain lake. This is heavenly.

The slack tide was set for around 5am and though we did not get up, we did feel the wake of at least a couple of passing boats on their way to transit Malibu Rapids – no one came in on this slack. We eventually got up at 7am, made the bed, hot coffee, and threw off the line for a slow cruise to see some waterfalls up close before heading to Chatterbox Falls in hopes of anchoring directly in front. While not lucky with the weather (low lying clouds and drizzle) we were lucky with our favorite anchorage. Other than the dock, the only way to anchor is with a stern tie up close to the quickly rising shore – somewhat of an inconvenience compared to simply dropping your anchor and chain to the appropriate scope. Anchoring in front of the falls gives you the luxury of the latter with the constant flow of fresh water from the falls keeping your boat from wandering around its anchor. At one point during low tide we could see our anchor high and dry while our boat still had ten to fifteen feet of water below. Picture perfect anchorage with an endless song track of water rushing over a cliff of rock. Now if the clouds would clear a little and the rain would stop.

Making spaghetti for dinner for later on this gray and rainy day in front of this huge waterfall is a pleasure to do and will go perfect with the weather.

Day 23: Lund to Egmont (Backeddy Resort and Marina)

Slept in till nearly 7:30 as the busy docks of yesterday were unexpectedly quiet this Sunday morning. Showers, refilled all water tanks and vacuumed the boat before hitting Nancy’s Bakery for take out breakfast treats and fresh baked bread. Back onto another calm day cruise on the Georgia and we know our luck with her must be running out soon…Breakfast burrito and a Bloody Mary as we make our way towards Egmont which is the last small outpost before the long fjord to Princess Louisa.

After being chased by a BC ferry between Nelson and Captain Islands we arrived at The Backeddy Resort and Marina. Currents were typically strong at the dock but managed a smooth landing. They don’t call it Backeddy for nothing. Time for laundry and wine on the restaurant deck with a lovely view north.

Today is my Mother’s Birthday (would have been 90) and marks the halfway point of our journey. To celebrate, nature whipped up an amazing thunderstorm complete with lightening, booming thunder that echoed around the mountain tops and a long hard downpour of rain that seemed
like a scene from the tropics. She would have loved it – or maybe she requested it. Lighting was dim, making for a great happy hour ambience. No better way to enjoy a happy hour Manhatten all from our cozy and mostly dry cockpit. Once the rain subsided a bit we went to the restaurant and enjoyed sharing a dinner of appy’s. The rain continued through the night aiding a good night’s sleep in preparation for tomorrow’s long haul to Princess Louisa Inlet.

Day 24: Egmont (Backeddy Marina) to Princess Louisa Inlet

No rush this sunny morning as we plan to ride in incoming tide to Princess Louisa that begins at noon. So after showers and cleanup we headed out for a hike to Sechelt Rapids (aka Skookumchuck Rapids) to see what an extra large ebbing tide looks like. Once again we didn’t realize how long a hike this would end up being and fortunately stopped at the bakery in the woods along the way – aptly named Skookumchuck Bakery and Cafe. What a treat with fresh baked english muffin breakfast sandwich and fresh toasted wheat bread with butter and avocado. Took it on the hike. The hike was three miles one way but on a well kept trail through rain forest setting and a very large pond. It’s difficult to describe Sechelt Rapids in full song – it’s a very inspiring demonstration of nature’s power. A wide, roaring salt water river moving at 16 knots complete with rapids and deep wide whirlpools winding around small islands and rock outcroppings. Truly an amazing sight. These are said to be the fastest tidal rapids in the world. The energy represented here is stunning. Well worth the seven mile, three hour hike.

Returned to Sea Natural at noon, topped off the fresh water tank and headed north for the 30 mile fjord cruise on an incoming tide. We had plenty of time since we couldn’t cross Malibu Rapids (the tidal barrier to Princess Louisa) until 6pm. Saved a lot of fuel at 1.7 GPH arriving at 5pm while enjoying spectacular mountain to sea scenery along the way. We thought we would have to wait an hour or so to enter the rapids but saw a sailboat and then another enter before we arrived. So we boldly entered an hour early on a flood tide for a nice little ride past the popular Malibu Young Life Christian Camp. Once inside the dog legged inlet we headed toward the nearby MacDonald Island and five park mooring bouys in hopes of a vacancy. Phew, only one in use so we roped on for an easy and secure anchorage. The sky turned dark with fewer sun breaks as the day wore on until thunderstorms appeared again. The sound was dramatic as the booms echoed throughout the fjord. More rain throughout the night rinsing our boat of salt spray. We will wait until morning at this quiet anchorage and watch for boats to pass by on their way out for the twice daily slack tide at Malibu Rapids before heading around the corner to see the scenery grow in size.

Day 22: Prideaux Haven to Lund

The very busy harbour of Lund, B.C.
The very busy harbour of Lund, B.C.

Woke up to experience pure wildlife at work and Direct TV has nothing on us this morning! First an eagle had parked himself on the little rocky island directly in front of us and was working on getting at those oysters that cover it. I got amazing close up photos of him and what a treat to see them so close and actually on land. After he flew off, which I did catch on camera, we had a short break before a mother Merganser and her flock of about 8 tiny chicks came swimming into our little cove! This is a diving bird that is just so rare to see and also very unusually pretty, and to also get to watch her chicks and their funny behavior and then get it all on video too is just a special day. The chicks follow wherever mom goes in spurts and lags, but when they get scared they all try to climb up on her back and luckily for the most part they all fit! What a treat and so hard to leave this special sight. I can now see the reason for getting up very early and into a quiet kayak as we see so many others do. It is the only way sometimes to catch the morning wildlife craze that disappears with each passing hour.

Onward by 7 AM to cruise to Lund where we will provision, refuel and try to deal with our holding tank issue. I am beginning to call it the poop deck. While we are once again back on the Georgia strait again but she is tame for now and we are using back island passages as cover, so a very calm morning which is welcome after last night.

Arrived into busy but homey Lund after just a two hour cruise and after refueling went into a holding pattern on the breakwater to wait our turn for the Pump Out station and a slip for the night. Finally time to deal with the poop deck issue. We paid ten bucks to use the only pump out station up here and what a deal it was for us. Where normally we would pump out and then rinse the tank anywhere from 0-3 times max, we had to rinse out a whopping 8 times! At least 5 gallons go in for each rinse so we figure probably took 50 gallons to get the sludge out…and miraculously the macerator finally came unplugged. Could have been a really bad day if it hadn’t…meaning Bill was going to have to take the whole unit apart and you really want a full body shield for that kind of issue. Needless to say we learned that “if it’s yellow, let it mellow…” is not the answer in a boat because the waste becomes too concentrated to pump out, in the words of the nurse on board, it was time for a marine enema. Sorry, TMI.

We split a delicious halibut and chips for lunch at a cute little bayside cafe and later had appetizers and wine at the Lund Hotel which has a rather western like atmosphere. We provisioned up in preparation for the extremely remote Princess Louisa and then rested and read before dinner.
Met a wonderful couple that parked right in front of us. Strangely we had just left them at Prideaux Haven this AM and had admired their unique tuggy looking trawler and had meant to ask to ask them about it up there. Found out it is called a Cherubini (they only made 100of them) and is 45 foot long which was deceiving because it is so well designed that it looked shorter from a distance. They invited us on board and served us drinks with a tour as they were eager to glean info from our cruise as they are headed now to the Broughtons. We fed them our highlights and thoroughly enjoyed our visit together. Lots of mosquitos in Lund and unfortunately despite our screens they got to us. We have a Bug Zapper along, which looks like a tennis racket and Donna was able to get them before dinner luckily. Fell into bed with the sunset after a muggy but welcome warm summer day, finally.

 

Day 21: Prideaux Haven

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Donna on her Scampi with Chaiya

Staying an extra night here so we were ecstatic when the boat with the most amazing view out of this bay weighed anchor and left it for us! It also has the benefit of its own tiny, private cove and with a required stern tie (which we have rarely needed to do) turned our boat so that we only looked out of the bay and no longer at the realms of boaters which has been an amazement to us. Just two weeks time up here can make all the difference in crowds, and when we came last June we were nearly completely alone!

Sun came out mid morning and with it the heat has returned, yeah! Rejuvenated, we got out our little Scampi, our one man inflatable kayak, and did some exploring in this beautiful cove which has rocks simply covered in oysters. Bill took the dinghy and Donna the kayak, and enjoyed the morning with lots of filming. Also I had to take Chaiya for a short kayak ride as he was smacking me with his paw and biting my leg–a sure indication when it comes to the dinghy as we have learned. Did some reading while Bill napped and every so often schools of about 8 inch sized fish came through our little cove. Able to sit up on the bow and take in this lovely sight for a good part of the afternoon, especially nice for happy hour. Then took the dinghy with electric motor out and around Laura and Melanie coves which have beautiful rock formations and hidden secret anchorages. Pulled our crab pot to no avail, too many people now and too few crabs…

Had leftover chicken taco salad and early to bed (haha, 10:00) after another great sunset. You have to stay up late for sun down. Our night wasn’t very restful unfortunately. Anchor chain kept rubbing against rocks, worrying us about dragging. After 1 AM realized we had so much chain out (which is actually the right thing to do) that it was moving around on the rocky bottom of the cove and transferred this really grating and worrisome noise to our bedroom in the bow of the boat. The wind had come up too which made the boat begin to move around even more and we contemplated moving to a safer sight in the middle of the night…not something you want to do. The upside, and there always is one we’ve found, is that it was a beautiful moonlit night which was lovely to see and did make our worried night make this kind of worry in a dark night so much better to assess. Finally slept after multiple checking for depth, etc.

Day 20: Octopus Islands to Desolation Sound

Prideaux Haven in Desolation Sound
Prideaux Haven in Desolation Sound

Up at 6 AM in order to get through the Hole in the Wall Rapids at slack tide. Such a beautiful morning and sunrise made it easy to wake up. Did our usual coffee, clothes and into the pilot seat with one exception. Thinking of doing a feature like Audobon Advisory and Tech Tips which we could call Curiosity Corner–this would give details as to daily, formerly unrevealed/unleashed life on the boat. Hopefully we don’t embarrass ourselves or the reader or our kids in the process! Anyway, for Curiosity Corner today: the head had begun to stink last night, and this is typical of our lengthy stay in certain remote areas where we have limited access to water for up to a week at a time. This is the case right now and to conserve water we employ multiple tactics. One of which is “if it’s yellow, let it mellow…” This saves a pint of our limited fresh water per two uses. There really is nowhere to take on fresh water up here since we don’t have a desalinator or ability to filter giardia from streams, etc. If you run out you have to leave. That’s the bottom line. Needless to say, Bill had toilet duty first thing at dawn–baking soda and a blue scratchy sponge (the one we use for dishes, haha) and all is well. Donna made up for his pain by doing all other chores and departure prep. Anyway, there are many other tactics for water conservation, we will continue to share.

Leaving the Octopus Islands was more beautiful than our arrival. We went out the east side rather than the northern channel, giving us visibility to many little islands and bare rocks. The sun certainly made a difference especially with the photos and the Hole in the Wall Rapids was no problem and actually had a very wild feel to it as a wind rushed up on on our starboard side. I’ve never felt more like filming than this morning. We saw a huge Golden Eagle take flight after the Rapids. They do not live in our Puget sound area so seeing them here is such a treat. Their largeness and mottled golden brown colors are very unique and surprising.

Curiosity Corner: obviously, without water conservation, these cruises into remote areas would not be possible. Here is much of what we do to ensure plenty of drinking water as the priority to lesser water for everything else.

  1. Hand sanitizer is a must.
    2. Showering every other day is no problem as long as we catch the first water from the shower head into a clean pan for recycling, as it is always cold anyway and would get wasted.
    3. We use a sun shower: 5 gallon bag of water that sits on the bow and absorbs solar rays.
    4. Kettle water can be used after coffee to wash/rinse dishes.
    5. Occasionally we use salt water to wash dishes and then fresh water to rinse only.
    6. Between the solar shower and additional containers strapped to the boat, we carry 18 additional gallons of water.
    7. We use the head as described above.

Into Rescue Cove, west Redondo Island, for lunch and we’ve been here before but didn’t stop. We are just outside of Desolation Provential park which we visited last summer. Thinking we will have lunch at the Cove restaurant and they also have the Flying Squirrel take out if you choose.
This is a very busy, funky little Marina that is owned as a co-op. Bought a few grocery items, then split the most delicious cheeseburger and huge oven potatoes we’ve had in a long time. All the while watching the world go by from up above in this fun and active community that is perched in levels on the side of the bay.

Only two hours further to Prideaux Haven, rhymes with Preview, and I’ve renamed it Preview Heaven because that is just exactly how it looks and feels! Last summer we stay in this same anchorage view area of picturesque islands and mountains. Sun finally out and we spent some time trouble shooting what to do about our plugged holding tank situation. Not good…luckily we are still only half full and so two nights here is doable but will have to address in Lund on Saturday before going out to the remote area of Princess Louisa on Sunday. Played games and watched a beautiful sunset for the first time in at least a week– so nice to warm up again.

 

Day 19: Octopus Islands 2nd Day

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Woke up to the same two eagles calling and this time sitting together on the same branch. While making coffee (Bill slept in a bit) I looked up to see a heron fly past our boat, a seal swim towards our boat and one of the two eagles make his way right past my window to sit with his mate on the branch. You snooze, you lose! This area of the Octopus islands has multiple small islets and is a lovely sight to explore and cruise around in.

Decided to dinghy out to the well known and rigorous hike today to a mountain lake (Newton Lake on Quadra Island) at the west end of Waiatt Bay after breakfast. We got a late start so luckily thought to bring trail snacks along with the water because we didn’t really realize what we were getting into…there are no signs or anything in our books to tell us how long this hike is. We got about a mile in and no one around when Bill spotted a tree that seemed to be bear scratched. Of course no bear spray because we thought there were lots of people going on this trail so got a little spooked after that. Started singing and making noise when a really nice couple came up behind us and we showed them the tree. Turned out to likely be wood peckers due to the height and type of indentations. Also this couple, Doug and Suzanna, from northern Vancouver BC had just done this hike yesterday and insisted we come along with them. It was so great to have the company and made the hike seem shorter than it really, really was…but so worth it in the end as we made our way up a long steep slope to a waterfall and past a pond and to the final destination. The funny thing about this whole trip is that it continues to be hard to reach a shoreline, it is negligible. And the dense foliage makes it difficult to get to the water. We parted ways with our new friends who were going swimming here for the second day in a row. Too bad we forgot our suits, haha! We did find some logs to walk out on and sit to take it all in and have some nourishment. Then a long hike back and it really got muggy. Along the way Bill spied two Downy woodpeckers which are rare to see and the smallest of the woodpecker family, and actually haven’t seen any since living on Vashon. Suddenly two became three as we realized they had their baby with then which is apparent due to lack of red on the head and it was following closely and crying. They all stayed together and did their pecking thing for a long time without seeming to care about our company, so able to film a little video! Donna spied a tiny trail down to an inlet we had passed on the way up and had to get a pic and then spotted a red-tailed squirrel after. At this point we were both getting dog tired and needing to refuel, but still a half mile to go…We had no idea of the time or how far this really was but think maybe 6 miles round trip. Boy were we surprised when we got back to the boat, sweaty and weary, and found it was after 4 pm already and time for happy hour, luckily. Such a great time and the bonus was our unexpected companions.

As we sat back thinking about our day with a Manhattan, a loon that we hadn’t noticed very close to us, suddenly called out to us in her a wild and enormous voice. I got some great close up shots of the loon which I hope to print out if possible–we can now use this camera mode which Bill recently found for large format photos on my favorite camera. Reminds us again of how far from Civilization we really are. After dinner we dinghy’d over with Chaiya to our new found friends in their sailboat who had returned in their kayaks, to rehash the day and exchange contact info. So exhausted but rejuvenated, we slept like logs.

 

Day 18: Blind Channel Resort to Octopus Islands

Looking east from Octopus Islands and Waiiat Bay
Looking east from Octopus Islands and Waiiat Bay

Got up around 7 in order to take another walk we didn’t get to yesterday around the bay to a viewpoint. It rained last night but lifting fog and filtered sun made our hike a nice one. Then it was time for showers and refilling the water tanks, this time with nice clear water, what a relief. Bill did that while I took the garbage up to, and I know this is a weird concept, pay to unload it. Usually we keep it until unloading is free again but we have not been out this long before and won’t see a free drop for awhile yet, also don’t want to risk stench. It was surprising how little we had (5#) and it all goes back to prepping with our food saver. Procured yet another cinnamon roll to share and just on time to get going for a deadline to our next triple Rapids crossing.

We are heading in a southwesterly direction for Dent Rapids, Gillard Passage and Yuculta Rapids for a triple header! You cannot transit these consecutive Rapids at anything but slack tide (twice daily only) and at any other time they become roaring angry rivers with giant waves, making them impassable for most private crafts. We got an amazing treat as we moved through the first set and a pod of large feeding Dolphins were jumping for joy off our port side and two even dived just below Donna’s window. They were so close you could see their size easily and appeared as large as small sharks with patterns of black and white like a baby orca might look. Of course it all happened too quickly to film so we just sat back and enjoyed the ride…better than Disneyland today! So glad we made our time frame without sacrificing the end of our stay at Blind Cove. The sun is trying to come out and they are calling for sun and 70’s by Wednesday. Fingers crossed as we hardly brought enough warm clothing and have nearly worn the little we have out!

We are looking forward to this next part of our cruise to Octopus Islands where there will be new terrain, better crabbing and lots of places to get off and explore or hike through. Bears are now becoming of more concern as we get into more remote areas so my bear spray is at the ready next to the back door! No forgetting it for this next chapter I say, as Bill just laughs at me and shakes his head. He is not sold on actually seeing any now but I am keeping my fingers crossed. Better safe than sorry.

Got through all three Rapids no problem but we may now have a 4 hour wait for the 4th one, called Hole-in-the-wall, which is further ahead. If so we will anchor for lunch and downtime. If we go through at 5 pm we will be right around the corner from our destination at octopus Is. And should arrive at 6 pm. Luckily we decided not to wait because just as we got near the point of no return and were on the fence about it, a large motorboat hailed us on the radio and announced he was coming through towards us (against current). So Bill and I took this as a positive sign and decided no turning back now! I asked if they wanted us to wait for them to pass but they said come ahead, we can see you fine. Bolstered by their company and confidence even though we are all 1 hour post slack tide, we powered through and out with very little turbulence. Yeah, we saved four hours!

Found a lovely and picturesque anchorage looking out from one inlet, through a storybook island and onto to an expanse of open water and huge mountains. Took two anchorages as Donna wasn’t quite satisfied with a smaller, more confined view. This always makes for just more anchoring experience and we have all the time in the world so who cares?

Sun breaks and slight drizzle on and off and two eagles just above our boat calling to each other. Lots of little islands to explore here and we plan to stay two nights, get the little kayak out, crab and watch the weather change hopefully for the better.

Day 17: Port Harvey to Blind Channel Resort

Wonderful gourmet dining at Blind Channel Resort
Wonderful gourmet dining at Blind Channel Resort

Day 17
Port Harvey to Blind Channel Resort

Leaving the Broughtons today in absolute calm water this morning on the Johnstone strait and it pays to get up early. The beauty of boating is that you can throw on some clothes, crawl into the pilot seat and do everything else while cruising along. That is just what we did today with a 7:30 departure after pulling our forever empty crab pot on the way out. Breakfast of boiled eggs, ham and some canned fruit was easy to do and forgot how much you appreciate the canned when out of fresh sometimes. Don’t forget the backup fruit! Also got dishes done and hair washed, laundry together and other minor chores/boat maintenance. We are looking forward to eating out in a well recommended restaurant at what is supposed to be a very lovely resort. There are many good hiking trails which we will try including one that leads to a 900 year old cedar, 16 foot diameter. Weather is a little bit of everything this AM, some filtered sun, clouds and light sprinkles.

Will be in the Octopus Islands by tomorrow. I think of this trip in five parts:
1. Cruising like mad to get up to the Broughtons and have some time there
2. The Brougtons
3. The Octopus Islands
4. Princess Louisa Inlet
5. Cruising home through favorite Canadian stops and San Juan.
So we made it into Blind Cove easily except that the current was strong so had to end up backing in in reverse for the fuel dock. This is always an excellent learning situation and we have had to work it that way before. After getting on the dock we went for a hike to see the 900 year old cedar and so great to get off the boat and walk! The tree was huge. It felt like we were walking through the whole rain forest on the Olympic peninsula.

Did some laundry while having a glass of wine in their outdoor cabana–the air is so warm and slightly muggy yet the clouds are so thick. Such a strange type of weather pattern. Talked with several folks, one of which actually looked at our old 26 foot Nordic tug that we sold 3 years ago. Such a small world for boating. Always someone knows someone…

Had dinner at the restaurant here which was so much fun and delicious shrimp for Donna, Sniezel for Bill. Before we headed for dinner a sweet fellow cat owner came up to us and we discussed having our cats onboard. Hers is having some trouble using the cat box and we of course talked about the benefits of kitty laxatone. She was so grateful and I was smiling because 20 years of cats on board has at least taught me this much!

Day 16: Echo Cove to Port Harvey

Back on the water today and so glad the clouds are lifting and sun out for awhile anyway. We are making our way back to Port Harvey which was really our first stay in this part of the Broughtons. We need to stay the night here since the next part of our journey necessitates getting back on the old Johnstone strait. So far the weather report is good for going out there tomorrow but we will see. We are making our way now to an area called the Octopus Islands which is a Provincial park and is supposed to be beautiful. Also should see some bears there. We have a following and incoming tide with smooth seas today which has made for a very calm cruise through more mountainous country again. So many Eagles, so little time.

Able to call Christopher this morning and catch up a little. He is printing and mailing our blog to his Grampa and Alyssa and Brittany are working on some photos for him. He is not technical these days so it will be a great gift to receive. So frustrated we have not been able to upload any photos yet…will probably end up doing them all at once so stay tuned.

Into Port Harvey around 3 pm and got our same anchorage. Took a dinghy ride over to the dock where they are rebuilding their cafe which sank last year. No ones really here except the Eagles and of course no amenities this year. Back to the boat and tried our hand for flounder and crabs but no success once again. Quiet evening here and to bed early after watching some Planet Earth (thank you kids!) in order to be up early for the Johnstone good weather window.